Those Calling @Amnesty Report Asymmetric Seek To Legitimize Boko Haram By Peregrino Brimah

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Amnesty Fraud: How Kingsley Kuku And His Committee Siphoned Cash Meant For Ex-Militants

Reports reaching our news desk indicates that, there have been massive fraud in the amnesty program which the ex militants are still undergoing. Since last year up to this moment, money meant for the ex militants have not been paid, including text books allowances, etc.

The special adviser on amnesty to the former president, Mr. Kingsley Kuku and his committee have been fingered in this fraud, as money meant for the ex militants have gone into their private pockets.

The session in the schools attended by the Ex militants comes to a close this month, with the ex militants struggling how to cope with the excesses of school expenditure and feeding.

Although Kingsley Kuku has stepped down from his post as the special Adviser, the dirty deals in the amnesty program remains. The committee have signed for and collected the cash meant for the ex militants without paying them because they see it as an avenue to divert the cash since a new government has been put in place and much questions on their activities may not be known.

None of the students in UK, South Africa, USA, Malaysia, Dubai, Philippines, Ukraine, Belarus, Russia and other countries have been paid their text books allowance since last year.

Those fingered in this fraud includes;Mr.kuku, Mr Eugene Abels, Mrs. Oyanbo Owie and Timi (who allegedly warmed the bed of Kuku) are the persons using the money for their personal interest to the detriment of the ex militants and the purpose of the fund.

Secrets Reporters, an online investigative news platform had earlier reported that the medical fees the amnesty office pay the schools all over the world are not used in the treatment of the students. Instead, the students use their personal money for feeding to treat themselves. This evil practice is still ongoing.

From our findings, it will be better for the amnesty committee to pay the medical fees directly to the students account to enable them the students pay for their medical bills themselves.

Mr. Michael Johnny is touted to be appointed as Special adviser to the president on Niger Delta amnesty program, due to his commitment in fighting against corruption in the Niger Delta State. The ex militants are already clamoring for his appointment to the position by President Muhammadu Buhari.

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Should The Amnesty International Report Be Ignored? By Bemdoo Hulugh

Not too long ago, Amnesty International released a report titled: “Stars on their shoulder. Blood on their hands”. This report exposed the human right abuses committed by the military in the north-east in executing the fight against boko haram militants. According to the report, more than 7000 men and boys died in military detention, more than 1,200 were rounded up and unlawfully shot, and more than 20,000(some as young as 9years) arrested and detained “in the most degrading, brutal, and inhuman conditions”. Amnesty International insist these human right abuses should be investigated and named some senior serving and retired military officers that should be investigated. The reason been that there are sufficient evidence from leaked military documents to prove that“…senior military officials were regularly updated on the high rates of deaths among detainees through daily field reports, letters, and assessment reports sent by field commanders to the defense and army headquarters”.

The military responded as expected. In the response signed by Director Defence Information, Major General,Chris Olukolade, the military denied all allegations and accused Amnesty International of blackmail, supporting or having a soft spot for the boko haram sect and on a deliberate mission to tarnish the imagine of the Nigerian military. For the military, it was a “bias and concocted report” that don’t deserve anybody’s attention. But President Buhari on the other hand thought otherwise as he confirmed receiving the report and promised to look into the disturbing allegations.

What surprised me the more was the response of ordinary Nigerians and some public commentators who were taking side with the military. They were everywhere from the television to online platforms arguing that the military has done nothing wrong. Some said it is war, so the military has done nothing wrong in killing people because American soldiers too killed Osama Bin Ladan and nobody said anything. I watched a man on Channels TV even accuse Amnesty International of envy and these are just some few crazy and strange arguments I heard from those supporting the military. They have certainly not been to the troubled north-east and don’t leave there, so they can easily say anything and move on. They can’t even remember that our history is stained with military recklessness.

Military recklessness is not new to us all. Just yesterday I saw in the news that the people of Zaki Biam were deserting their village immediately they heard a soldier was shot and killed in their village. If we all can still remember what happened in this same Zaki Biam(the Zaki Biam massacre) in 2001, then you will understand the fear of the villagers. For those of you who don’t know, it was on 22, october,2001, in a reprisal attack for the killing of nineteen soldiers, the military went on a three day killing spree in Zaki biam. Then too Amnesty International called for an inquiry but the military denied that any civilian was killed and that they only carried out operations to recover stolen weapons taken from their murdered soldiers.

Before Zaki Biam, it was the town of Odi, precisely on November 20, 1999, in a reprisal attack for the killing of twelve police officers, the Nigerian military leveled this town. After the operation about 2,500 civilians were killed and the only thing left standing in the town was the bank, the Anglican church and the health centre.

In the north-east too it happened in Baga on April 16, 2013, when on another revenge attack for a soldier that was killed in that village, the Nigerian military burnt down houses and shot villagers indiscriminately. The military still denied this too that only six civilians were killed( as if that is even acceptable) in their “successful” operation against boko haram and that anyone blaming them is sympathising with the boko haram sect.

The shocking thing is that with all these terrible atrocities committed by our military year in, year out. There is no soldier standing trial for all these henious crimes. There is no good reason for a right thinking Nigerian to believe that the military are not committing these terrible crimes in the north-east presently. They must have carried so many reprisal attacks because they have also lost so many soldiers there too.

Ahmad Salkilda, a reporter who can be regarded as an authority on the boko haram sect once narrated how he was judged guilty by association and almost executed in the government house in maiduguri. If not luck, he could have easily been counted in that report as one of the 1,200 rounded up and shot by the military. He also told a disturbing story about his encounter with a woman in Maiduguri whose husband and two brothers where killed by Nigerian soldiers right in front of her and the truama made her have a miscarriage. All the woman wanted from him was to give her number to the boko haram sect because she wanted to kill as many soldiers before they kill her. How many people in the north-east have been shot, detained, suffocated and strangled by the Nigerian military because they have been judged guilty by assumption? I guess only God knows. So many people in the north-east may be faced with the difficult decision of choosing between the military(government) and boko haram sect who are all killing them.

On 16th April 2011, Salisu Adamu, a 300Level student at the university of Maiduguri, came back from school,ate food and went to bed only to be woken up late in the night by the military and taken to Giwa barracks were he was detained for three years. His education was put on hold and it is only luck that preserved his life. There are certainly so many others like Salisu among the more than 20,000 detained in degrading conditions by the military, so why are some strange people saying the report of Amnesty International should be ignored?

For me society can only move forward when there is a system that reward good to encourage people and punish those who go wrong to discourage the act. In Odi, the murder of more than 2,500 civilians by the military was not investigated with a strange excuse that they were ambushed on their way. When the military killed more than 500 civilians in Zaki biam, nobody took another look into it with another excuse that it was an operation to recover weapons stolen from the soldiers that were murdered. In Baga,they called it a “successful” operation. And now that Amnesty International has accused the Nigerian military of killing more than 8000 people and unlawfully detaining 20,000, I still hear people saying we should forget about it because it’s war. Do we need this military recklessness to reach our doorstep before we say It is enough? If it is true that there can be no peace without justice, then the fight against boko haram will not be complete unless these senior retired and serving military officers and all other soldiers involved in these crimes against humanity are made to answer for the crimes they committed or allowed to happen under their watch. All men and women of goodwill must support our military in the fight against the boko sect but also insist that the rights of law abiding citizens are not violated.

Bemdoo Hulugh is an active citizen, he writes from Makurdi.
You can also interact with him on tweeter @bumy04.

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Open Letter To The Secretary General Of Amnesty International By Paul John

When Amnesty International was established in July 1961 by Peter  Benenson in the United Kingdom,he claimed to have been motivated by the injustice meted out to two Portuguese students. According to him,he was travelling in the London Underground on November 19,1960 when he read that two Portuguese students from Coimbra had been sentenced to seven years of imprisonment in Portugal for allegedly ‘having drunk a toast to liberty’. Till date,researchers have never traced the alleged newspaper article in question. Will I be wrong if I say that the organisation was founded on falsehood since the said article that motivated the founder has never been  traced by any researcher  ? In view of this and other activities of your organisation ,by 1980 Amnesty International drew more criticisms from governments. The defunct USSR alleged that your organisation conducted espionage,the Moroccan government denounced it as a defender of law breakers,the Argentine government banned Amnesty International’s 1983 annual report.

When I look at  the roles of some international organisations and some western countries , I may  be tempted  to conclude that Boko Haram is politically motivated hence  there must be international sponsors . It took many months,even years ,before many western countries and international organisations accepted to list Boko Haram among the Foreign Terrorist Organisations (FTO) .For a terrorist Organisation that has killed many  innocent Nigerians  mostly women,children and religious worshippers,what your organisation is interested in is the alleged abuse of  human rights by our military. Is your organisation telling us that those helpless Nigerians  killed by Boko Haram did not have any human rights or that the Boko Haram group has the right to keep on killing innocent citizens unchallenged ?

Your lopsided report is akin to American government’s  refusal to sell sophisticated military equipment to the Nigerian military in their fight against  Boko Haram sect, citing human rights abuse by our military as their main reason. Are the rights of those alleged to have been  abused by our military more than the rights of the children,aged mothers,pregnant mothers and other innocent citizens that were and are constantly being killed by the Boko Haram sect? Why should your report come up now that the  Nigerian military is already winning the war against Boko Haram ,if it is not intended to weaken and discourage our military? Where was your report when Boko Haram slit the throats of innocent and helpless school children at Buni Yadi, Yobe state? Where was your organisation when Chibok girls were kidnapped by the same Boko Haram sect? Where was your report when the Boko Haram sect was winning the war because there was no sophisticated  military equipment to tackle them?

When your Organisation was established in 1961, why did you not deem it necessary to revisit how King Jaja of Opobo was allegedly poisoned with a cup of tea? In case you don’t know that history,when the European powers designated Opobo as a British territory due to the outcome of the 1884 Berlin conference ,king Jaja refused to cease taxing British traders,Henry Hamilton Johnson ,a British vice consul,invited Jaja to negotiations in 1887. When Jaja arrived ,the British arrested him and tried him in Accra,the then Gold coast. Thereafter he was taken to London for sometime. In 1891 Jaja was granted permission to return to Opobo ,but died en route allegedly poisoned with a cup of tea  . Did your organisation not consider that King Jaja’s rights were equally abused or did he not have any right then ?

When America invaded  sovereign countries like Iraq and Afghanistan ,where were your reports ? Even in Nigeria,where was your report when there were massacres in Odi,Bayelsa state and Zaki Ibiam,Benue state ? The way some international organisations and some western countries are behaving towards the fight against this deadly Boko Haram group sends a wrong signal that Boko Haram may have international sponsors, possibly to achieve the much-expected disintegration  of Nigeria since the 2015 general elections did not achieve that. I think the report of anything comes at the end or when  all actions have been concluded ,how come your report came up when our military is having an upper hand against the Boko Haram and are at the verge  of exterminating the deadly sect  ? Was the report  intended to distract our military  so that the Boko Haram sect can regroup and start launching their vicious attacks on innocent and helpless citizens the same way they did when some people claiming to be  Boko Haram secretary and chieftains deceived the immediate past government with amnesty negotiations?

Initially Boko Haram started bombing churches believing that Christians could carry out reprisal  attacks on  Muslims and their mosques but when that did not happen they started bombing mosques, believing that Muslims could attack Christians but that still failed .They are currently bombing markets and other public places and I don’t want to believe that this recent amnesty report is aimed at  dividing  Nigerians along regional lines because the Igbos are already crying foul why their own Azubuike Ihejirika(the only Igbo  to occupy such post since we returned to democracy in 1999) was indicted and the Niger deltans  are also  waiting for Kenneth Minimah to be  ‘victimized’ . This is because after the Odi and Zaki Ibiam massacres ,the then chief of Army staff was not indicted by your organisation . I don’t want to believe that those that predicted the disintegration of  Nigeria are also working for its actualisation . Some Nigerians are  beginning to believe that this amnesty report is aimed at either distracting the military in their final fight to exterminate the Boko Haram sect from Nigerian soil or to further polarise Nigerians along regional lines hence actualising the much-expected disintegration  of Nigeria.

I want Amnesty International to tell me one country whose military does not abuse human right. I equally want to see any military in the world that uses court injunctions to liberate a town that is held by terrorists. I will be glad if Amnesty International will show me  any  military in the world  that fights wars without civilian casualty . While watching the online commentary on how the former Iraqi leader,Saddam Hussein ,was captured ,I saw how the American soldiers used torture to force the bodyguards of Saddam Hussein to show them were Saddam was hiding . Why didn’t the soldiers use court injunction to get where Saddam was hiding ? As a lover of history,I know how international collaborations helped in the disintegration of the former USSR because much-touted world powers  saw the then  USSR as a threat but I still thank God that Russia,the remnant of that Soviet Union , is still a threat to those that worked for the splitting of the defunct USSR.

It was reported that the Nigerian  military officers  that revolted sometime ago ,did so because of the lectures they received from the American Intelligence officers that came to train Nigerian military officers. Sequel to that,the immediate past government terminated that bilateral agreement between Nigeria and America. Was it not preposterous that the same American government that refused to sell sophisticated  military equipment to us to fight Boko Haram ,was ready and willing in sending their Military Intelligence officers to come and train Nigerian soldiers to fight the same Boko Haram? I think Amnesty should map out the strategies how every country’s military should carry their operations without abusing  human rights because I don’t see any possibility where the military can liberate a town held by terrorists without any civilian casualty because some innocent civilians must be trapped in the town held . I still cannot envisage a time when the military will extract information from a captured terrorist,who  disguised as a civilian,with a  court injunction . I still wonder if any military will be gentle with civilians who are either sympathetic to terrorists or help the terrorists in escaping/carrying out their nefarious activities..

I think if Amnesty International is sincere,they should be thinking of how to bring justice to the children ,pregnant women,the aged and children that were murdered in cold blood by this deadly Boko Haram sect. What of the helpless and poor children who  are now orphans due to Boko Haram activities or the  innocent Nigerians that are daily sent to their early graves by this Boko Haram sect?  Amnesty international, I think what Nigerians want now is any report that will  help us to exterminate this deadly Boko Haram in order to save the lives of innocent Nigerians that will soon become victims of terrorism .Having achieved that,we may then start addressing any alleged human rights abuse by our military. This is because an Igbo adage says that one does not pursue a rat when one’s house is on fire.

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Nigeria: Conditions For A Federal Government Amnesty For Boko Haram By Peregrino Brimah

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I Will look Into Amnesty International Report On Torture – Buhari

President Muhammadu Buhari has acknowledged the receipt of the Amnesty International report on Nigeria titled “Nigeria: Stories of horror in their own words.”
 
Senior Special Assistant (Media & Publicity), Mal. Garba Shehu said in a press statement in Niamey, Niger Republic on Wednesday, 3 June that President Buhari has received the report which he says contains many disturbing allegations.
 
According to Shehu, President Buhari assured his administration will study the document and act appropriately.
 
“I assure you that your report will be looked into,” President Buhari said.
 
He said without meaning to prejudice the outcome of any investigation, Nigerians needed to be reassured that “this administration will leave no stone unturned to promote the rule of law, and deal with all cases of human rights abuses.
 
“Respect for human rights and adherence to the rule of law are the life and soul of the democratic system. We will not tolerate or condone impunity and reckless disregard for human rights.”
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Boko Haram: Amnesty International Indicts Ihejirika, Minimah, Top Military Chiefs For War Crimes…Petitions ICC, Buhari, Demands For Their Prosecution

The Nigerian military, including senior military commanders, must be investigated for participating in, sanctioning or failing to prevent the deaths of more than 8,000 people murdered, starved, suffocated, and tortured to death, according to a comprehensive report released today by Amnesty International.

Based on years of research and analysis of evidence – including leaked military reports and correspondence, as well as interviews with more than 400 victims, eyewitnesses and senior members of the Nigerian security forces – the organization outlines a range of war crimes and possible crimes against humanity committed by the Nigerian military in the course of the fight against Boko Haram in the north-east of the country.

The report, “Stars on their shoulders. Blood on their hands: War crimes committed by the Nigerian military”, reveals that, since March 2011, more than 7,000 young men and boys died in military detention and more than 1,200 people were unlawfully killed since February 2012.

Amnesty International provides compelling evidence of the need for an investigation into the individual and command responsibilities of soldiers, and mid-level and senior-level military commanders. The report outlines the roles and possible criminal responsibilities of those along the chain of command – up to the Chief of Defence Staff and Chief of Army Staff – and names nine senior Nigerian military figures who should be investigated for command and individual responsibility for the crimes committed.

“This sickening evidence exposes how thousands of young men and boys have been arbitrarily arrested and deliberately killed or left to die in detention in the most horrific conditions. It provides strong grounds for investigations into the possible criminal responsibility of members of the military, including those at the highest levels,” said Salil Shetty, Amnesty International’s Secretary General.

“Whilst an urgent and impartial investigation of these war crimes is vital, this report is not just about the criminal responsibility of individuals. It is also about the responsibility of Nigeria’s leadership to act decisively to end the pervasive culture of impunity within the armed forces.”

Amnesty International is calling for Nigeria to ensure prompt, independent and effective investigations of the following military officers for potential individual or command responsibility for the war crimes of murder, torture and enforced disappearance detailed in this report:

* Major General John A.H. Ewansiha

* Major General Obida T Ethnan

* Major General Ahmadu Mohammed

* Brigadier General Austin O. Edokpayi

* Brigadier General Rufus O. Bamigboye

Amnesty International is further calling for Nigeria to ensure prompt, independent and effective investigations of the following high-level military commanders for their potential command responsibility for crimes committed by their subordinates. They would be responsible if they knew or if they should have known about the commission of the war crimes and failed to take adequate action to prevent them or to ensure the alleged perpetrators are brought to justice:

* General Azubuike Ihejirika – (Chief of Army Staff, Sept 2010 – Jan 2014).

* Admiral Ola Sa’ad Ibrahim – (Chief of Defence Staff, Oct 2012 – Jan 2014).

* Air Chief Marshal Badeh – (Chief of Defence Staff, Jan 2014 – time of writing)

* General Ken Minimah (Chief of Army Staff, Jan 2014 – time of writing)

Mass deaths in custody

In their response to Boko Haram’s attacks in the north-east, the Nigerian military have arrested at least 20,000 young men and boys since 2009, some as young as nine years old. In most cases they were arbitrarily arrested, often based solely on the word of a single unidentified secret informant. Most were arrested in mass “screening” operations or “cordon-and-search” raids where security forces round up hundreds of men. Almost none of those detained have been brought to court and all have been held without the necessary safeguards against murder, torture and ill-treatment.

Detainees are held incommunicado in extremely overcrowded, unventilated cells without sanitary facilities and with little food or water. Many are subjected to torture and thousands have died from ill-treatment and as a result of dire detention conditions. One former detainee told Amnesty International: “All I know was that once you get detained by the soldiers and taken to Giwa [military barracks], your life is finished.”

A high-ranking military officer gave Amnesty International a list of 683 detainees who died in custody between October 2012 and February 2013. The organization also obtained evidence that in 2013, more than 4,700 bodies were brought to a mortuary from a detention facility in Giwa barracks. In June 2013 alone, more than 1,400 corpses were delivered to the mortuary from this facility.

A former detainee who spent four months in detention described how on arrival “The soldiers said: “Welcome to your die house. Welcome to your place of death”. Only 11 of the 122 men he was arrested with survived.

 Starvation, dehydration and disease

Amnesty International researchers witnessed emaciated corpses in mortuaries, and one former Giwa detainee told the organization that around 300 people in his cell died after being denied water for two days. “Sometimes we drank people’s urine, but even the urine you at times could not get.”

The evidence gathered from former detainees and eyewitnesses is also corroborated by senior military sources. One senior military officer told Amnesty International that detention centres are not given sufficient money for food and that detainees in Giwa barracks were “deliberately starved.”

Disease – including possible outbreaks of cholera – was rife. A police officer posted at a detention facility known as the “Rest House” in Potiskum told Amnesty International how more than 500 corpses were buried in and around the camp. “They don’t take them to the hospital if they are sick or to the mortuary if they die,” he said.

 Overcrowding and suffocation

Conditions of detention in Giwa barracks and detention centres in Damaturu were so overcrowded that hundreds of detainees were packed into small cells where they had to take turns sleeping or even sitting on the floor. At its peak, Giwa barracks, which was not built as a detention facility was accommodating more than 2,000 detainees at one time.

“Hundreds have been killed in detention either (by soldiers) shooting them or by suffocation,” a military officer told Amnesty International, describing the situation in Sector Alpha detention centre (known as ‘Guantanamo’). Amnesty International has confirmed that on a single day, 19 June 2013, 47 detainees died there as a result of suffocation.

 Fumigation

In order to combat the spread of disease and stifle the stench, cells were regularly fumigated with chemicals. Fumigation may have led to the deaths of many detainees in their poorly ventilated cells. One military official based at Giwa barracks told Amnesty International: “Many Boko Haram suspects died as a result of fumigation. They fumigated with the chemicals you use for killing mosquitoes. It is something very powerful. It is very dangerous.”

 Torture

Amnesty International has received consistent reports as well as video evidence of torture by the military during and after arrest. Former detainees and senior military sources described how detainees were regularly tortured to death, hung on poles over fires, tossed into deep pits or interrogated using electric batons. These findings are consistent with widespread patterns of torture and ill-treatment documented by Amnesty International over a number of years, most recently in the 2014 report, ‘Welcome to hell fire’: Torture in Nigeria.

Extrajudicial executions

More than 1,200 people have been unlawfully killed by the military and associated militias in north-east Nigeria. The worst case documented by Amnesty International took place on 14 March 2014 when the military killed more than 640 detainees who had fled Giwa barracks after Boko Haram attacked.

Many of these killings appear to be reprisals following attacks by Boko Haram. A senior military official told Amnesty International that such killings were common. Soldiers “go to the nearest place and kill all the youths… People killed may be innocent and not armed,” he said.

In a so-called “mop up” operation following a Boko Haram attack in Baga on 16 April 2013, a senior military official told Amnesty International how the military “transferred their aggression on the community”. At least 185 people were killed.

Detainees were also routinely killed. One military officer based in Giwa Barracks told Amnesty International that since the end of 2014, very few suspects were even taken into custody but were immediately killed instead. This was confirmed by several human rights defenders and witnesses.

High level military commanders knew of the crimes

The highest levels of Nigeria’s military command, including the Chief of Army Staff and Chief of Defence Staff, were regularly informed of operations conducted in north-east Nigeria.

Evidence shows that senior military leaders knew, or should have known, about the nature and scale of the crimes being committed. Internal military documents show that they were updated on the high rates of deaths among detainees through daily field reports, letters and assessment reports sent by field commanders to Defence Headquarters (DHQ) and Army Headquarters.

Amnesty International has seen numerous requests and reminders sent from commanders in the field to DHQ warning of the rise in the number of deaths in custody, the dangers of fumigation and requesting a transfer of detainees. In addition, reports by teams sent by DHQ to assess military facilities and “authenticate data”, highlight death rates and warn that overcrowding was causing serious health problems and could lead to “an epidemic”.

Amnesty International has verified this knowledge and failure to act from a number of sources, including interviews with senior military officers. One military source told Amnesty International: “People at the top saw it but refused to do anything about it.”

Need for action

“Despite being informed of the death rates and conditions of detention, Nigerian military officials consistently failed to take meaningful action. Those in charge of detention facilities, as well as their commanders at army and defence headquarters, must be investigated,” said Salil Shetty.

“For years the Nigerian authorities have downplayed accusations of human rights abuses by the military. But they cannot dismiss their own internal military documents. They cannot ignore testimonies from witnesses and high-ranking military whistle blowers. And they cannot deny the existence of emaciated and mutilated bodies piled on mortuary slabs and dumped in mass graves.”

“We call on newly-elected President Buhari to end the culture of impunity that has blighted Nigeria and for the African Union and international community to encourage and support these efforts. As a matter of urgency, the President must launch an immediate and impartial investigation into the crimes detailed in Amnesty International’s report and hold all those responsible to account, no matter their rank or position. Only then can there be justice for the dead and their relatives.”

In a swift reaction, the Nigerian military in a statement today by the Director Defence Information dismissed the allegations calling them a pure blackmail. The statement reads: “the Defence Headquarters has noted with dismay the gruesome allegations made by the Amnesty International against some senior military officers serving and retired of the Nigerian Armed Forces. It is unfortunate that all effort made in the allegation was geared towards continuation of blackmail against the military hierarchy in which the organisation had embarked upon as far back as the inception of military’s action against terrorist in the North East.

“The officers mentioned in the report have no reason, whatsoever, to indulge in the allegation made against them. It is unfortunate that the organisation just went out to gather names of specified senior officers, in a calculated attempt to rubbish their reputation as well as the image of the military. The action, no doubt, depicts more of a premeditated indictment aimed at discrediting the country for whatever purpose.

Each of the previous allegations had been thoroughly responded to and cleared in the public and officially. The title down to the body of the allegation smacks of the extreme bias, which is disturbing coming from an otherwise reputable organisation that is expected to be Just and fair to all. Unfortunately in this case, has taken a premeditated position, which is far from noble.

It is curious that a body that has never been able to seriously condemn terror in Nigeria now claims to have done an extensive research with the aim of discrediting the nation’s effort at curtailing terror.

It is clear that Amnesty International (AI) becomes more active in presenting distractive allegations whenever the terrorists are losing ground in the battle. It is very unfortunate that Amnesty International has used this report to further confirm its questionable interest in the counter-terrorism effort in Nigeria.

It will be recalled that the Joint Investigation Team was set up by the Defence Headquarters as part and parcel of efforts to ensure that no detainee suffer unjustly. The detention facilities were thrown open for visits and inspections by independent bodies such as International Committee of the Red Cross and other reputable international organisations and personalities.

Amnesty International is advised to stop playing the role of an irritant coming up loudly only when the terrorists are losing out and remaining silent or complacent whenever the terrorist heightens its atrocities. It is unfair to persist in effort to discredit Nigerian military by seeking all avenues to stigmatise individual officers of the nation’s military purely to satisfy an agenda against the security agencies and image of Nigeria before the international community.

The Nigerian Armed Forces is quite conscious of the fact that the operation has prompted the need to save citizens from abuse of their rights by mindless terrorists. Accordingly, the forces have continued to state and restate its commitment to the rights of Nigerians and all its citizens while prosecuting its anti-terrorism campaign. It is very unfortunate that Amnesty International has chosen to ignore all the responses and clarifications provided to its enquires by the authorities.

It is unfair to rely on records or reports provided by certain disgruntled elements or faceless collaborators who have axe to grind with the system as evidence against officers who have been conscientiously doing their duty to defend the nation and her citizens.

For avoidance of doubt, the Nigerian military does not encourage or condone abuse of human rights neither will any proven case be left unpunished. The kind of impunity being alleged by Amnesty International has no place in the Nigerian military. Every officer in the field is responsible for his action and is duly held accountable. So far, no allegation has been sufficiently proved against those whom Amnesty International is so desperate to convict.

The statistics are largely spurious or manipulated to satisfy a clandestine motive. Indeed, the loud publicity given to these damning allegations suggests an intention to blackmail the military and particular senior officers rather than a sincere advise to the government. This cruel tendency is not new, despite the timing.

“The Nigerian military therefore rejects the biased and concocted report provided by Amnesty International. Additional definite response will be provided subsequently as deemed necessary.”

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Alleged Human Rights Abuses: Amnesty International Report Intended To Blackmail The Nigerian Military – DHQ

The Defence Headquarters has noted with dismay the gruesome allegations made by the Amnesty International against some senior military officers serving and retired of the Nigerian Armed Forces. It is unfortunate that all effort made in the allegation was geared towards continuation of blackmail against the military hierarchy in which the organisation had embarked upon as far back as the inception of military’s action against terrorist in the North East.

The officers mentioned in the report have no reason, whatsoever, to indulge in the allegation made against them. It is unfortunate that the organisation just went out to gather names of specified senior officers, in a calculated attempt to rubbish their reputation as well as the image of the military. The action, no doubt, depicts more of a premeditated indictment aimed at discrediting the country for whatever purpose.

Each of the previous allegations had been thoroughly responded to and cleared in the public and officially. The title down to the body of the allegation smacks of the extreme bias, which is disturbing coming from an otherwise reputable organisation that is expected to be Just and fair to all. Unfortunately in this case, has taken a premeditated position, which is far from noble.

It is curious that a body that has never been able to seriously condemn terror in Nigeria now claims to have done an extensive research with the aim of discrediting the nation’s effort at curtailing terror.

It is clear that Amnesty International (AI) becomes more active in presenting distractive allegations whenever the terrorists are losing ground in the battle. It is very unfortunate that Amnesty International has used this report to further confirm its questionable interest in the counter-terrorism effort in Nigeria.

It will be recalled that the Joint Investigation Team was set up by the Defence Headquarters as part and parcel of efforts to ensure that no detainee suffer unjustly. The detention facilities were thrown open for visits and inspections by independent bodies such as International Committee of the Red Cross and other reputable international organisations and personalities.

Amnesty International is advised to stop playing the role of an irritant coming up loudly only when the terrorists are losing out and remaining silent or complacent whenever the terrorist heightens its atrocities. It is unfair to persist in effort to discredit Nigerian military by seeking all avenues to stigmatise individual officers of the nation’s military purely to satisfy an agenda against the security agencies and image of
Nigeria before the international community.

The Nigerian Armed Forces is quite conscious of the fact that the operation has prompted the need to save citizens from abuse of their rights by mindless terrorists. Accordingly, the forces have continued to state and
restate its commitment to the rights of Nigerians and all its citizens while prosecuting its anti-terrorism campaign. It is very unfortunate that Amnesty International has chosen to ignore all the responses and
clarifications provided to its enquires by the authorities.

It is unfair to rely on records or reports provided by certain disgruntled elements or faceless collaborators who have axe to grind with the system as evidence against officers who have been conscientiously doing their duty to defend the nation and her citizens.

For avoidance of doubt, the Nigerian military does not encourage or condone abuse of human rights neither will any proven case be left unpunished. The kind of impunity being alleged by Amnesty International has no place in the Nigerian military. Every officer in the field is responsible for his action and is duly held accountable. So far, no allegation has been sufficiently proved against those whom Amnesty International is so desperate to convict.

The statistics are largely spurious or manipulated to satisfy a clandestine motive. Indeed, the loud publicity given to these damning allegations suggests an intention to blackmail the military and particular senior officers rather than a sincere advise to the government. This cruel tendency is not new, despite the timing.

The Nigerian military therefore rejects the biased and concocted report provided by Amnesty International. Additional definite response will be provided subsequently as deemed necessary.

*CHRIS OLUKOLADE*

Major General

Director Defence Information

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Nigeria: Senior Members Of Military Must Be Investigated For War Crimes – Amnesty International

  • horrific war crimes committed by Nigeria’s military including 8,000 people murdered, starved, suffocated, and tortured to death;
  • senior military commanders, named by Amnesty International, must be investigated in relation to war crimes and possible crimes against humanity;
  • new government needs to ensure the protection of civilians and bring to an end the culture of impunity within the Nigerian armed forces.

The Nigerian military, including senior military commanders, must be investigated for participating in, sanctioning or failing to prevent the deaths of more than 8,000 people murdered, starved, suffocated, and tortured to death, according to a comprehensive report by Amnesty International.

Based on years of research and analysis of evidence – including leaked military reports and correspondence, as well as interviews with more than 400 victims, eyewitnesses and senior members of the Nigerian security forces – the organization outlines a range of war crimes and possible crimes against humanity committed by the Nigerian military in the course of the fight against Boko Haram in the north-east of the country.

The report, Stars on their shoulders. Blood on their hands: War crimes committed by the Nigerian military, reveals that, since March 2011, more than 7,000 young men and boys died in military detention and more than 1,200 people were unlawfully killed since February 2012.

Amnesty International provides compelling evidence of the need for an investigation into the individual and command responsibilities of soldiers, and mid-level and senior-level military commanders. The report outlines the roles and possible criminal responsibilities of those along the chain of command – up to the Chief of Defence Staff and Chief of Army Staff – and names nine senior Nigerian military figures who should be investigated for command and individual responsibility for the crimes committed.

“This sickening evidence exposes how thousands of young men and boys have been arbitrarily arrested and deliberately killed or left to die in detention in the most horrific conditions. It provides strong grounds for investigations into the possible criminal responsibility of members of the military, including those at the highest levels,” said Salil Shetty, Amnesty International’s Secretary General.

“Whilst an urgent and impartial investigation of these war crimes is vital, this report is not just about the criminal responsibility of individuals. It is also about the responsibility of Nigeria’s leadership to act decisively to end the pervasive culture of impunity within the armed forces.”

Amnesty International is calling for Nigeria to ensure prompt, independent and effective investigations of the following military officers for potential individual or command responsibility for the war crimes of murder, torture and enforced disappearance detailed in this report:

* Major General John A.H. Ewansiha

* Major General Obida T Ethnan

* Major General Ahmadu Mohammed

* Brigadier General Austin O. Edokpayi

* Brigadier General Rufus O. Bamigboye

Amnesty International is further calling for Nigeria to ensure prompt, independent and effective investigations of the following high-level military commanders for their potential command responsibility for crimes committed by their subordinates. They would be responsible if they knew or if they should have known about the commission of the war crimes and failed to take adequate action to prevent them or to ensure the alleged perpetrators are brought to justice:

* General Azubuike Ihejirika ­- Chief of Army Staff, Sept 2010 – Jan 2014).

* Admiral Ola Sa’ad Ibrahim ­- Chief of Defence Staff, Oct 2012 – Jan 2014).

* Air Chief Marshal Badeh ­- Chief of Defence Staff, Jan 2014 – time of writing

* General Ken Minimah ­- Chief of Army Staff, Jan 2014 – time of writing

Mass deaths in custody

In their response to Boko Haram’s attacks in the north-east, the Nigerian military have arrested at least 20,000 young men and boys since 2009, some as young as nine years old. In most cases they were arbitrarily arrested, often based solely on the word of a single unidentified secret informant. Most were arrested in mass “screening” operations or “cordon-and-search” raids where security forces round up hundreds of men. Almost none of those detained have been brought to court and all have been held without the necessary safeguards against murder, torture and ill-treatment.

Detainees are held incommunicado in extremely overcrowded, unventilated cells without sanitary facilities and with little food or water. Many are subjected to torture and thousands have died from ill-treatment and as a result of dire detention conditions. One former detainee told Amnesty International: “All I know was that once you get detained by the soldiers and taken to Giwa [military barracks], your life is finished.”

A high-ranking military officer gave Amnesty International a list of 683 detainees who died in custody between October 2012 and February 2013. The organization also obtained evidence that in 2013, more than 4,700 bodies were brought to a mortuary from a detention facility in Giwa barracks. In June 2013 alone, more than 1,400 corpses were delivered to the mortuary from this facility.

A former detainee who spent four months in detention described how on arrival “The soldiers said: “Welcome to your die house. Welcome to your place of death”. Only 11 of the 122 men he was arrested with survived.

Starvation, dehydration and disease

Amnesty International researchers witnessed emaciated corpses in mortuaries, and one former Giwa detainee told the organization that around 300 people in his cell died after being denied water for two days. “Sometimes we drank people’s urine, but even the urine you at times could not get.”

The evidence gathered from former detainees and eyewitnesses is also corroborated by senior military sources. One senior military officer told Amnesty International that detention centres are not given sufficient money for food and that detainees in Giwa barracks were “deliberately starved.”

Disease – including possible outbreaks of cholera – was rife. A police officer posted at a detention facility known as the “Rest House” in Potiskum told Amnesty International how more than 500 corpses were buried in and around the camp. “They don’t take them to the hospital if they are sick or to the mortuary if they die,” he said.

Overcrowding and suffocation

Conditions of detention in Giwa barracks and detention centres in Damaturu were so overcrowded that hundreds of detainees were packed into small cells where they had to take turns sleeping or even sitting on the floor. At its peak, Giwa barracks ­– which was not built as a detention facility ­–­ was accommodating more than 2,000 detainees at one time.

“Hundreds have been killed in detention either (by soldiers) shooting them or by suffocation,” a military officer told Amnesty International, describing the situation in Sector Alpha detention centre (known as ‘Guantanamo’). Amnesty International has confirmed that on a single day, 19 June 2013, 47 detainees died there as a result of suffocation.

Fumigation

In order to combat the spread of disease and stifle the stench, cells were regularly fumigated with chemicals. Fumigation may have led to the deaths of many detainees in their poorly ventilated cells. One military official based at Giwa barracks told Amnesty International: “Many Boko Haram suspects died as a result of fumigation. They fumigated with the chemicals you use for killing mosquitoes. It is something very powerful. It is very dangerous.”

Torture

Amnesty International has received consistent reports as well as video evidence of torture by the military during and after arrest. Former detainees and senior military sources described how detainees were regularly tortured to death, hung on poles over fires, tossed into deep pits or interrogated using electric batons. These findings are consistent with widespread patterns of torture and ill-treatment documented by Amnesty International over a number of years, most recently in the 2014 report, ‘Welcome to hell fire’: Torture in Nigeria.

Extrajudicial executions

More than 1,200 people have been unlawfully killed by the military and associated militias in north-east Nigeria. The worst case documented by Amnesty International took place on 14 March 2014 when the military killed more than 640 detainees who had fled Giwa barracks after Boko Haram attacked.

Many of these killings appear to be reprisals following attacks by Boko Haram. A senior military official told Amnesty International that such killings were common. Soldiers “go to the nearest place and kill all the youths… People killed may be innocent and not armed,” he said.

In a so-called “mop up” operation following a Boko Haram attack in Baga on 16 April 2013, a senior military official told Amnesty International how the military “transferred their aggression on the community”. At least 185 people were killed.

Detainees were also routinely killed. One military officer based in Giwa Barracks told Amnesty International that since the end of 2014, very few suspects were even taken into custody but were immediately killed instead. This was confirmed by several human rights defenders and witnesses.

High level military commanders knew of the crimes

The highest levels of Nigeria’s military command, including the Chief of Army Staff and Chief of Defence Staff, were regularly informed of operations conducted in north-east Nigeria.

Evidence shows that senior military leaders knew, or should have known, about the nature and scale of the crimes being committed. Internal military documents show that they were updated on the high rates of deaths among detainees through daily field reports, letters and assessment reports sent by field commanders to Defence Headquarters (DHQ) and Army Headquarters.

Amnesty International has seen numerous requests and reminders sent from commanders in the field to DHQ warning of the rise in the number of deaths in custody, the dangers of fumigation and requesting a transfer of detainees. In addition, reports by teams sent by DHQ to assess military facilities and “authenticate data”, highlight death rates and warn that overcrowding was causing serious health problems and could lead to “an epidemic”.

Amnesty International has verified this knowledge and failure to act from a number of sources, including interviews with senior military officers. One military source told Amnesty International: “People at the top saw it but refused to do anything about it.”

Need for action

“Despite being informed of the death rates and conditions of detention, Nigerian military officials consistently failed to take meaningful action. Those in charge of detention facilities, as well as their commanders at army and defence headquarters, must be investigated,” said Salil Shetty.

“For years the Nigerian authorities have downplayed accusations of human rights abuses by the military. But they cannot dismiss their own internal military documents. They cannot ignore testimonies from witnesses and high-ranking military whistle blowers. And they cannot deny the existence of emaciated and mutilated bodies piled on mortuary slabs and dumped in mass graves.”

“We call on newly-elected President Buhari to end the culture of impunity that has blighted Nigeria and for the African Union and international community to encourage and support these efforts. As a matter of urgency, the President must launch an immediate and impartial investigation into the crimes detailed in Amnesty International’s report and hold all those responsible to account, no matter their rank or position. Only then can there be justice for the dead and their relatives.”

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Asari Dokubo Condemns Niger Delta Amnesty Programme, Says It Is A Bribe

Leader of the Ijaw Youth Council, Mr. Asari Dokubo, has condemned the amnesty granted to the ex-Niger Delta militants by the late president, Umaru Yar’adua.

According to him, this was a bribe to allow oil flow from the Niger Delta region to the North. He said that was the reason he rejected the offer.

Dokubo, who gave the clarification during the 2015 MASSOB day celebration, held in Owerri, Imo State, also faulted the national conference organised by the Federal Government, insisting that the exercise did not represent the views of the Niger Delta region that is yearning for a referendum.

“It only represented the views of the rest of the country. Let us be allowed to have a referendum. We have the right to hold a referendum on where we want to go,” he argued.

He described MASSOB and his group as partners in progress who are moving in the same direction to arrive at a common destination as one people and nation.

Dokubo, who faulted the last general elections in the country, decried the pace of growth and development of the nation over the years, noting that there should be massive infrastructural provision to stimulate the economy with conscious and unpolluted efforts to bring about industrial growth and job creation.

Meanwhile, members of MASSOB had a confrontation with the police at the Assumpta Roundabout while riding in convoy to the state capital for the celebration.

An eyewitness account had it that the police who had stationed their vehicles at the popular Control Post, Owerri, asked the MASSOB members to retreat but they refused and were teargassed by the police.

It was said that MASSOB members, who were numbered over 500, had hauled stones at the police, who shot in the air to scare them away.

Meanwhile, the Imo State Commissioner of Police, Austin Evbakvbokun, while confirming the incident, said that the police halted the movement of the MASSOB members to the state capital because they do not have a permit for such gathering.

He added that the group conducted itself in a disorderly manner, carrying insignias, which were not of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, thus necessitating the prompt action of his men to stop them.

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Abducted Nigerian Women, Girls Forced To Join Boko Haram Attacks- Amnesty International …Submits Report To ICC

At least 2,000 women and girls have been abducted by Boko Haram since the start of 2014 and many have been forced into sexual slavery and trained to fight, said Amnesty International on the first anniversary of the abduction of the Chibok school girls.

Based on nearly 200 witness accounts, including 28 with abducted women and girls who escaped captivity, a new 90-page report, ‘Our job is to shoot, slaughter and kill’: Boko Haram’s reign of terror, documents multiple war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by Boko Haram, including the killing of at least 5,500 civilians, as it rampaged across north-east Nigeria during 2014 and early 2015.

The Amnesty International report sheds new light on the brutal methods used by the armed group in north-east Nigeria where men and boys are regularly conscripted or systematically executed and young women and girls are abducted, imprisoned and in some cases raped, forcibly married and made to participate in armed attacks, sometimes on their own towns and villages.

“The evidence presented in this shocking report, one year after the horrific abduction of the Chibok girls, underlines the scale and depravity of Boko Haram’s methods,” said Salil Shetty, Amnesty International’s Secretary General.

“Men and women, boys and girls, Christians and Muslims, have been killed, abducted and brutalized by Boko Haram during a reign of terror which has affected millions. Recent military successes might spell the beginning of the end for Boko Haram, but there is a huge amount to be done to protect civilians, resolve the humanitarian crisis and begin the healing process.”

The report contains graphic evidence, including new satellite images, of the scale of devastation that Boko Haram have left in their wake.

Abductions 
The 276 schoolgirls abducted from Chibok gained global attention with the help of the #BringBackOurGirls campaign. But the missing schoolgirls are only a small proportion of the women, girls, young men and boys abducted by Boko Haram.

Boko Haram would take the women and girls they abducted directly to camps in remote communities or to makeshift transit camps such as one established in Ngoshe prison. From transit camps Boko Haram would move them to houses in towns and villages and indoctrinate them with their version of Islam in preparation for marriage.

Aisha, aged 19, spoke to Amnesty International about how she was abducted from a friend’s wedding in September 2014 along with her sister, the bride and the bride’s sister. Boko Haram took them to a camp in Gulak, Adamawa state, home to approximately 100 abducted girls. One week later, Boko Haram forced the bride and the bride’s sister to marry their fighters. They also taught Aisha and the other women and girls how to fight.

“They used to train girls how to shoot guns. I was among the girls trained to shoot. I was also trained how to use bombs and how to attack a village,” Aisha told Amnesty International. “This training went on for three weeks after we arrived. Then they started sending some of us to operations. I went on one operation to my own village.”

Aisha said that during the three months that she was held captive, she was raped repeatedly, sometimes by groups of up to six fighters. She also saw more than 50 people killed by Boko Haram, including her sister. “Some of them refused to convert. Some refused to learn how to kill others. They were buried in a mass grave in the bush. They’ll just pack the dead bodies and dump them in a big hole, but not deep enough. I didn’t see the hole, but we used to get the smell from the dead bodies when they start getting rotten.”

Mass killings 
Since the start of 2014, Amnesty International documented at least 300 raids and attacks carried out by Boko Haram against civilians. During their attacks on towns, they would systematically target the military or police first, capturing arms and ammunition, before turning on the civilian population. They would shoot anyone trying to escape, rounding up and executing men of fighting age.

Ahmed and Alhaji, aged 20 and 18, were seated with other men, waiting for their throats to be cut after Boko Haram took over Madagali on 14 December 2014. Ahmed told Amnesty International that even though his instinct told him to run, he could not. “They were slaughtering them with knives. Two men were doing the killing…We all sat on the ground and waited our turn.” Alhaji only managed to escape when a Boko Haram executioner’s blade became too dull to slit more throats. “Before they got to my group, they killed 27 people in front of me. I was counting every one of them because I wanted to know when my turn would come.” He said that at least 100 men who refused to join Boko Haram were executed in Madagali on that day.

In Gwoza, Boko Haram killed at least 600 people during an attack on 6 August 2014. Witnesses told Amnesty International how anyone trying to escape would be pursued. “The motorcycles went to surrounding areas, each street corner, where they will shoot you. They are only shooting the men.”

Thousands fled to nearby mountains where Boko Haram fighters hunted them down and forced them out of the caves where they were hiding with tear gas canisters. The women were then abducted. The men were killed.

Burning and looting: new satellite images of the destruction of Bama

Satellite imagery commissioned by Amnesty International has enabled the organization to document the scale of devastation wreaked by Boko Haram.

This includes new before and after images of Bama commissioned for the report. These show that at least 5,900 structures, approximately 70 percent of the town, were either damaged or destroyed, including the hospital, by retreating Boko Haram fighters as the Nigerian military regained control of the town in March 2015.

Witnesses interviewed by Amnesty International described how Bama’s streets were littered with bodies and how people were burned alive in buildings. One woman said: “When the military got close to the barracks [in Bama] and almost took over, they [the military] later withdrew. Then the insurgents started killing people and burning houses.”

Life under Boko Haram
The report documents the reign of terror for those under Boko Haram rule. Soon after taking control of a town, Boko Haram would assemble the population and announce new rules with restrictions of movement, particularly on women. Most households became dependent on children to collect food or on visits by Boko Haram members who offered assistance, distributing looted food.

Boko Haram enforced its rules with harsh punishments. Failure to attend daily prayers was punishable by public flogging. A woman who spent five months under Boko Haram control in Gamborou told Amnesty International how she had seen a woman given 30 lashes for selling children’s clothes and a couple executed publicly for adultery.

A 15-year-old boy from Bama, spared by Boko Haram due to his disability, told Amnesty International that he had witnessed 10 stonings. “They stone them to death on Fridays. They will gather all the children and ask them to stone. I participated in the stoning… They will dig a hole, bury all the body and stone the head. When the person dies, they will leave the stones until the body decays.”

The report also highlights growing tensions between Christians and Muslims. Many Christians interviewed by Amnesty International believe that Muslims have informed Boko Haram of their whereabouts or failed to share information about impending attacks and this has left a legacy of distrust between some communities that previously lived harmoniously side-by-side. Whilst Boko Haram has destroyed churches and killed Christians who refuse to convert to Islam, they have also targeted moderate Muslims.

Amnesty International is calling on Boko Haram to stop killing civilians and for the Nigerian government to take all possible legal steps to ensure their protection and restore security in the north-east. The international community should also continue to assist the new government of Nigeria in addressing the threat posed by Boko Haram.

“The change of government in Nigeria provides an opportunity for a new approach to security in Nigeria after the dismal failure of recent years,” said Salil Shetty.

“The abducted must be rescued, war crimes and crimes against humanity must be investigated. Bodies must be disinterred from mass graves, further killings must be prevented and those guilty of inflicting this unspeakable suffering must be brought to justice.”

The information on Boko Haram documented by Amnesty International should be considered by the International Criminal Court as part of its ongoing preliminary examination of the situation in north-east Nigeria.

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Abdulsalami’s ‘Peace’ Committee: Another Amnesty For Terrorists By Peregrino Brimah

No secret, ex-president Abdulsalami Abubakar is chief cabal amnesty negotiator. The cabal are lining up in droves, from Jonathan through Dangote to Diezani; Abdulsalami negotiates amnesties aka, ‘peace’ deals. If Abdulsalami did not negotiate – according to those who speak for the committee while not realizing the implications of their words – there will be war, terror will be unleashed.

If Abdulsalami did not negotiate an amnesty for Jonathan, Jonathan would have waged a war. There would have been no peace. If Abdulsalami does not negotiate for all the other cabal, Nigeria will face the full wrath of their terror. All praise to Abdulsalami, and also to Jonathan for agreeing to the deals else Jonathan would not have retired after 8 years in Aso rock but would have unleashed terror on Nigeria.

We were warned by Jonathan’s men of the consequences of him losing. From Akpabio to Jimi Agbaje to Nuhu Ribadu to Dokubo the warnings were the same: you must re-elect Jonathan else there will be terror unlimited; else Nigeria will be blasted to smithereens. So of course as Jonathan was voted out in spite of all antics played by him, the NSA, MoD and Service chiefs, an amnesty had to be negotiated.

It is a pity that Nigeria loves negotiating amnesties with terrorists. The nation is where it is today for this very reason. The amnesty negotiated with MEND led to the explosion in oil theft and pollution in the Niger Delta with the certification of shameless terrorists who continue to openly threaten the country and even its neighbors with foul utterances from their putrid cavities. Jonathan begged to sign amnesties with Boko Haram and kept postponing the war till the terrorists took over half of Adamawa and our patriotic local hunters had to step in and save the day. The current amnesty Abdulsalami is spearheading with these economic terrorist cabal is no different: a sin, an abomination and a curse on Nigeria.

No thanks Abdulsalami, they should have done their worst. Some of us were prepared to fight. Perhaps it is time we fight that war for the pride and dignity of the common man to finally be restored in this land. I have never been a fan of Abdusaalami; I hold him for the death of a friend and father to me, late Brigadier General Tunde Idiagbon related to the transfer of Nigeria to the cabal in the fourth republic sham.

Cabal led by Abubakar Abdulsalami meet president-elect to discuss impunity

Abdulsalami, dictator Bagangida’s brother, the founders of the PDP, willfully handed over Nigeria to these vultures and as I see him again spearheading an unconscionable amnesty for terrorists who have destroyed the hope and promise of our nation, who have cemented the masses in desolation; who have plundered money they will only eventually lose in Swiss banks, to the death of our elderly and the unleashing of deadly terror on our defenseless, I hate him even more. Hate is a strong word, I know. But people like this that never give up but always continue to negotiate for terrorists against the interests and dignified survival of the masses deserve no less. Why are masses not invited to the amnesty table to choose as is their right and theirs only? We will not back down.

#BringBackOurMoney #BringBackOurDignity

Dr. Peregrino Brimah; http://ENDS.ng [Every Nigerian Do Something] Email: drbrimah@ends.ng Twitter: @EveryNigerian

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